Ministry Results-based Plan 2013-14

Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services

Results-based Plan 2013-14


Ministry Overview

Ministry Financial Information

Appendix I: Annual Report 2012-13


Ministry Overview


Ministry Vision, Mission/Mandate

The Ontario Government is committed to making Ontarians safer in their communities by being tough on crime through strong enforcement and effective crime prevention.

The mandate of the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services (MCSCS) is to ensure that all of Ontario's diverse communities are supported and protected by law enforcement and that public safety and correctional systems are safe, secure, effective, efficient and accountable.

The Ministry’s Directional Statement is “serving all of Ontario’s diverse communities to keep our province safe.” The Ministry strives to meet this commitment through high performance policing, strong enforcement, leading edge scientific and technological investigative work, emergency management expertise, community safety preparedness and effective inmate supervision and offender rehabilitation.

The Ministry has a wide range of responsibilities, which include:

  • Policing Services - the Ministry is dedicated to ensuring the safety and security of the public through front-line policing, effective crime prevention, police oversight services and establishing policing standards to make our communities safe.
  • Correctional Services - the Ministry is committed to enhancing community safety through effective supervision, care, custody and intervention as well as influencing the behavioural change and re-integration of inmates/offenders into Ontario communities.
  • Public Safety - the Ministry contributes to public safety programs and the effective administration of justice through the provision of forensic and coroners’ investigative services, coroners’ inquests, pathology services, and fire safety, including fire investigation/prevention and support of municipal fire services. The Ministry is also responsible for the legislation governing private security and animal welfare.
  • Emergency Management - on behalf of the Government, the Ministry provides leadership, support and coordination of emergency programs in the province at municipal, ministry and government-wide levels. It maintains the Provincial Emergency Operations Centre to ensure 24/7 situational awareness and support for actual or potential incidents impacting Ontario and provides over-arching emergency management and business continuity plans to inform more specialized plans by Order-in-Council ministries. It works with other jurisdictions in Canada and in contiguous states to support broader emergency management activities.
  • Inter-Ministerial Liaison - the Ministry is committed to working with its Justice Sector partners, the Ministries of the Attorney General and Children and Youth Services, to transform the way justice works for the people of Ontario by building a more responsive and efficient justice system.

Key Priorities and Results

Every family deserves to feel safe and secure in their home and on the streets of their community. The Ontario Government’s approach to personal and community safety is to be tough on crime and be tough on the causes of crime. The Ministry is focused on the following five key goals:

  1. Deliver services and set standards, policies and guidelines in policing, corrections and public safety to keep Ontario’s communities and Ontarians safe.
  • Take a leadership role in child sexual exploitation investigations and continue to administer the Provincial Strategy Against Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation on the internet in partnership with the Ontario Provincial Police and municipal police agencies across the province.
  • Enhance the proactive approach to deterring and reducing crime through the implementation of Ontario's Mobilization and Engagement Model of Community Policing.
  • Implement recommendations of the Public Inquiry into Paediatric Forensic Pathology in Ontario to strengthen Ontario’s death investigation system.
  • Institute constructive change through the review and/or implementation of recommendations arising from the Cornwall Public Inquiry.
  • Ensure police are equipped with the tools and technology to enhance investigative capacity, combat crime and enforce safety on our roadways, waterways and trails.
  • Effectively manage the adult corrections population and reduce re-offending through early intervention, intensive supervision, enforcement, diversion and rehabilitation.
  • Continue to raise standards in the private security industry through measures that are consistent with the Regulators Code of Practice.
  • Establish and maintain partnerships for the coordinated planning, management and response to large scale emergencies, critical incidents and major events.
  • Maintain the Major Case Management system to assist police services with managing serial and predator type investigations.
  • Monitor police services to ensure that adequate and effective police services are provided at the municipal and provincial levels.
  • Conduct a system of inspection and review of police services to ensure compliance with legislative requirements.
  • Maintain the Constable Selection System in partnership with the Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police.
  1. Contribute to an effective, efficient and seamless justice system that serves all of Ontario’s diverse communities.
  • Manage capacity pressures in correctional institutions and address remand issues through ongoing operational capacity review and infrastructure initiatives.
  • Leverage science and technology to improve and support the delivery of effective public safety services including the transition to a new Forensic Services and Coroner’s Complex.
  • Engage policing partners and affected stakeholders in initiatives related to the sustainability of current and future policing and public safety requirements.
  • Enhance public awareness and understanding of the Ministry’s mandate and the related costs of delivering the services that are vital to the security and safety of Ontario.
  • Beginning in 2012, implement the upload of court security costs from municipalities, up to $125 million per year at maturity in 2018.
  1. Deliver responsive programs and services that meet the unique needs of Ontario’s diverse communities.
  • Support vulnerable Ontarians with enhanced employee awareness training and the delivery of specialized crime prevention programs.
  • Provide public education regarding fire safety and emergency management for diverse, newcomer and hard to reach communities.
  • Enhance the number of diverse programs for racialized, Aboriginal, female and French speaking inmates/offenders.
  • Ensure all grant programs are in compliance with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA), ensuring accessibility for all Ontarians by removing barriers for people with disabilities.
  1. Work with Aboriginal communities to address their community safety service delivery needs and develop harmonious and mutually respectful relationships.
  • Collaborate with First Nations and the Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs to address policing related recommendations of the Ipperwash Inquiry.
  • Enhance First Nations policing through administration of the Ontario First Nations Policing Agreement by the Ontario Provincial Police and support the sustainability of stand-alone services under the First Nations Policing Program.
  • Cooperate with the Ministry of the Attorney General on a variety of initiatives that contribute to reaching the goals and objectives of Ontario’s Aboriginal Justice Strategy.
  • Develop and implement a plan with First Nations concerning the death investigation process as it pertains to Aboriginal culture and beliefs.
  • Continue to ensure that all grant programs are available to Aboriginal communities.
  • Effectively administer the First Nations Policing Grant in compliance with the tripartite agreements between the federal and provincial/territorial government and First Nations.
  • Enhance Ontario’s capacity to coordinate the evacuation of First Nations communities in the Far North through inter-ministerial partnerships and continued enhancements to the first provincial mass evacuation emergency response plan and the Joint Emergency Management Steering Committee service standards.
  1. Lead and promote a healthy, diverse and engaged workforce and organization that reflects the Ministry’s values and the communities we serve.
  • Provide broad access to employment opportunities, promoting equity and inclusion and ensuring that the Ministry’s outreach, recruitment, retention and promotion systems are inclusive and representative of Ontario’s diversity.
  • Increase employee engagement.
  • In partnership with the Ontario Human Rights Commission and the Ministry of Government Services, the Ministry will work to ensure that long term systemic change initiatives are completed and properly implemented.

Key Performance Measures

The Ministry is committed to making Ontarians safe in their communities by focusing on the following performance measures:

  • The rate of traffic fatalities1 in areas of Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) jurisdiction per 10,000 vehicles registered was 0.412 in 2012. The three-year (2010-2012) provincial average is 0.38.3 The OPP is committed to ensuring that the rate of traffic fatalities in OPP jurisdictions does not exceed the three-year provincial average.
  • The clearance rate for violent crimes1 in OPP jurisdictions was 89.5 per cent4 in 2012. The OPP is committed to maintaining the clearance rate for violent crimes in OPP jurisdictions at or above the three-year average. The 2013 target, based on the 2010-2012 average, is 89.7 per cent.
  • The rate of injuries in preventable structure fires per million population (based on the five-year average) was reduced from the baseline of 73.1 (1997 to 2001) to 52.1 in 2012 (results based on 2011 data). The Ministry is committed to ensuring that the annual rate of injuries in preventable structure fires does not exceed the five-year average for the previous period. The 2013-2014 target, based on the 2007-2011 average, is 52.25.
  • There were no escapes from secure areas of any adult institution in 2012-2013 (year to date)4. The Ministry is committed to ensuring no escapes.

Ministry Activities

Community Safety

Public Safety Division

The Public Safety Division works with its policing partners to promote community safety. Activities include: training through the Ontario Police College; scientific analysis in the Centre of Forensic Sciences; oversight of private security practitioners; development of policing guidelines and standards; monitoring and inspecting police services; administration of crime prevention grants; support for intelligence led operations; management of provincial appointments and the Constable Selection System; delivery of the Major Case Management system; the promotion of animal welfare; and, representing the Province in negotiating tripartite First Nations Policing Agreements.


Ontario Provincial Police (OPP)

The OPP has a unique mandate to provide both provincial policing and policing services to 323 Ontario municipalities on a contract or non-contract basis. In addition, the OPP administers policing for 19 First Nations communities and provides direct policing services to 20 other First Nations communities under the Ontario First Nations Policing Agreement.

The Police Services Act further mandates the OPP to deliver a wide array of specialized and technical services, including criminal investigation, search and rescue and recovery, intelligence, aviation services, provincial communications and dispatch, and leadership. These services are provided to OPP-policed communities and in support of all municipal and First Nations police services across Ontario, as required. The OPP UCRT, Urban Search and Rescue - Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosive (USAR-CBRNE) Response Team, responds to any high level emergency if requested. The OPP also coordinates law enforcement efforts to reduce criminal activities, including: the Violent Crimes Linkages Analysis System (ViCLAS); the Provincial Strategy to Protect Children from Sexual Abuse on the Internet; and, the Ontario Sex Offender Registry.


Emergency Management Ontario (EMO)

EMO is the provincial coordinating body for emergency management activities in Ontario. EMO provides leadership, support, oversight and coordination of emergency programs in the province at municipal, ministry, and government-wide levels. It maintains the Provincial Emergency Operations Centre to ensure 24/7 situational awareness and support for actual or potential incidents impacting Ontario and provides over-arching emergency management and business continuity plans to inform more specialized plans by Order-in-Council ministries. EMO works with other jurisdictions in Canada and in contiguous states to support broader emergency management activities. The Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act provides the legislative mandate. EMO also operates the Ministry’s Emergency Operations Centre (MEOC) as an essential element of its mandate to manage and maintain the Ministry’s emergency management program in accordance with legislation. 


Office of the Chief Coroner and Ontario Forensic Pathology Service

The mandate of the Office of the Chief Coroner (OCC) is to answer questions surrounding deaths through investigation and/or publicly held inquests under the Coroners Act and to use the information gathered to prevent similar deaths and to promote public safety. The OCC is particularly concerned with deaths that are sudden and unexpected. In every death investigation, the OCC seeks to answer five questions - who, when, where, how and by what means a person died.

The Ontario Forensic Pathology Service (OFPS) is the legislatively defined system that provides forensic pathology services under the Coroners Act, as amended on July 27, 2009. The OFPS provides medico-legal autopsy services for public death investigations at the request of and under the legal authority of Ontario coroners. The OFPS, in partnership with the University of Toronto, currently operates the only training program for Forensic Pathologist fellows in Canada.


Office of the Fire Marshal (OFM)

OFM works to minimize the loss of life and property from fire in Ontario by supporting municipalities, fire services and other public safety agencies to meet the needs of their communities, including public education, fire prevention, firefighting, fire protection, training and fire investigation. The OFM also advises the Government on public fire safety, policy, standards and legislation relating to fire prevention and protection, and investigating the cause, origin and circumstances of any fire/explosion that might have caused a loss of life, serious injury or damage to property.


Correctional Services

The mandate of Correctional Services is to supervise the detention and release of adult inmates, provide supervision to offenders serving sentences in the community on Ontario parole, conditional sentence or probation, and to provide training, rehabilitative treatment and services designed to create an environment in which offenders may achieve changes in attitude and behaviour that provide opportunities for successful reintegration into the community. Correctional Services has three divisions: Institutional Services (IS), Community Services (CS) and Operational Support (OS). Authority for IS and CS is provided under both provincial and federal legislation including the Ministry of Correctional Services Act, Provincial Offences Act and the Criminal Code of Canada.


Ministry Administration, Policy and Justice Technology Services

Ministry Administration Program

The Ministry’s core businesses are supported by corporate services that provide leadership, direction, planning and modern controllership. Ministry Administration activities include the Minister’s Office, Office of the Deputy Minister of Community Safety, Office of the Deputy Minister of Correctional Services, Office of the Chief Administrative Officer, Communications Branch, Legal Services Branch, Business and Financial Planning Branch, Strategic Business Unit, and Facilities and Capital Planning Branch, which co-ordinates and delivers capital projects and manages accommodations for all Ministry locations across Ontario. The program also shares Justice Sector services for freedom of information, French language services, and audit.


Policy and Strategic Planning Division

Reporting to the Deputy Minister of Community Safety and the Deputy Minister of Correctional Services, this corporate division is responsible for leading/coordinating the development of advice, analysis and recommendations in support of Ministry and Government priorities. Key functions/services include the development of policy and legislation, strategic planning, research and evaluation, performance measurement and maintenance of key indicators, and coordination of many of the Ministry’s activities with other ministries and key stakeholders.


Justice Technology Services Cluster

The Justice Information & Information Technology (I&IT) Cluster delivers reliable and cost-effective technology services in alignment with the corporate I&IT Strategic Plan that enable and support business priorities and goals across the Justice Sector ministries. The Cluster serves the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services and the Ministry of the Attorney General in their entirety, as the major components of Ontario’s Justice Enterprise, including their respective Agencies, Boards and Commissions (ABCs), and the Ministry of Children and Youth Services, Youth Justice Services Division. Key support is provided in technology solutions, information management and planning, services management, security and project management.


Highlights of Achievements

The Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services is committed to ensuring that Ontario’s communities are supported and protected by law enforcement and public safety systems that are safe, secure, effective, efficient and accountable.

Safer Streets for Ontario Families

  • Youth Action Plan will help to build stronger neighbourhoods
  • Helping communities tackle crime and gang violence
  • Investing in a successful anti-violence strategy
  • Making the internet safer for children
  • Reduce Impaired Driving Everywhere (RIDE) spot checks along Ontario’s streets, highways, trails and waterways
  • Keeping more police officers on the streets
  • Engagement with police and municipal partners through Future of Policing Advisory Committee
  • The Ontario Provincial Police’s first fully operational bilingual detachment
  • Celebrating 50 years of excellence in police training

Supporting a More Secure Ontario

  • Increasing fire protection in retirement homes and care facilities
  • Testing Ontario’s emergency response capabilities
  • Supporting rescue efforts in Elliot Lake
  • Sandy Lake evacuation
  • Supporting Wawa evacuation and responding to Hurricane Sandy
  • Three-point plan to strengthen animal protection and enforcement
  • Preventing cycling and pedestrian deaths

Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC)

  • Ontario becomes the first province to give TRC access to a correctional facility

Investing in Infrastructure

  • State-of-the-art Forensic Services and Coroner’s Complex nears completion
  • Modernizing Ontario’s correctional infrastructure

Details of the above achievements are provided in Appendix I (page 18).


Ministry Organization Chart


Legislation

Legislation administered by the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services:

Ammunition Regulation Act, 1994

Regulates the sale of ammunition. The Act requires that purchasers be a minimum of 18 years old and requires that businesses keep certain records.

Anatomy Act

Allows the General Inspector (Chief Coroner) to send bodies, which are donated or unclaimed, to universities or colleges for educational purposes.

Christopher’s Law (Sex Offender Registry), 2000

Requires sex offenders who are residents of Ontario to register with police on an annual basis and any time they change their address. The Ministry is required to maintain the registry and provide access to the police.

Coroners Act

Provides for investigation into circumstances surrounding a death. The Act sets out the circumstances under which an inquest will be held and the procedures for holding an inquest.

Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act

Addresses both emergency preparedness and emergency response at municipal and provincial levels. The Act requires municipalities and ministries to develop emergency programs and formulate emergency plans.

Fire Protection and Prevention Act, 1997

This Act governs fire safety in Ontario and sets fire protection requirements for municipalities. The Act establishes the Office of the Fire Marshal to oversee the operation of fire departments.

Firefighters’ Memorial Day Act, 2000

Establishes the first Sunday in October as Firefighters’ Memorial Day.

Imitation Firearms Regulation Act, 2000

Regulates the sale and other transfers of imitation firearms and deactivated firearms, and prohibits the purchase or sale of starter pistols capable of being adapted for use as firearms.

Interprovincial Policing Act, 2009

Provides a framework for the exercise of police powers in Ontario by police officers from other provinces. Reciprocal legislation in other provinces permits Ontario police to exercise powers in those provinces.

Mandatory Blood Testing Act, 2006

Enables certain classes of persons who have come into contact with the bodily substance of another to make an application for an order to have that person’s blood tested for HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis B and C.

Mandatory Gunshot Wounds Reporting Act, 2005

Requires hospitals that treat a person for gunshot wounds to disclose that fact to the local police.

Ministry of Correctional Services Act

Establishes the legislative framework for correctional services in Ontario and governs matters relating to the detention and release from custody of remanded and sentenced inmates. The Act provides for community supervision services and establishes the Ontario Parole Board. Pursuant to Order in Council 497/2004, the powers assigned to the Minister of Correctional Services were transferred to the Minister of Community Safety and Correctional Services.

Ministry of the Solicitor General Act

Establishes the Ministry of the Solicitor General. Pursuant to Order in Council 497/2004, the powers assigned to the Solicitor General were transferred to the Minister of Community Safety and Correctional Services.

Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act

Sets out inspection, enforcement and appeal procedures for the prevention of cruelty to animals and deals with animals in distress. The Act creates the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and the Animal Care Review Board.

Police Services Act

Provides the legislative framework for policing in Ontario. This Act sets out requirements for municipalities to decide on the method of providing adequate and effective policing in their communities.

Private Security and Investigative Services Act, 2005

This Act regulates private investigators and security guards. The Act replaced the Private Investigators and Security Guards Act.

Public Works Protection Act

Provides peace officers and specially appointed guards with authority to ensure the protection of a “public work”. Public work includes a variety of “works”, any provincial or municipal building, and any place designated by the Lieutenant Governor in Council.


Agencies, Boards and Commissions (ABCs)

Advisory and Adjudicative ABCs make communities safer by providing independent oversight and adjudicative services that protect the interest of the public.

Ontario Police Arbitration Commission (OPAC) - Adjudicative

The Commission provides conciliation and mediation-arbitration services under the Labour Relations Part VIII of the Police Services Act to assist police associations and police services boards in the resolution of disputes arising out of contract negotiations and the administration of their collective agreements.

Constable Joe MacDonald Public Safety Officers’ Survivors Scholarship Fund - Advisory

This funding provides for the cost of tuition, textbooks, living and accommodation expenses for post-secondary education to the spouses and children of public safety officers who have died in the line of duty.

Fire Marshal’s Public Fire Safety Council - Advisory

Established in 1993, the Council promotes fire prevention and public education through sponsorships and partnerships with various groups and individuals interested in public safety. The Council is a corporation without share capital under the Fire Protection and Prevention Act, 1997, and is comprised of representatives from the fire service, industry and the public. Working at arm’s length from government, it forms partnerships, raises and distributes funds, and endorses programs and products necessary to further the development of Ontario as a fire-safe community.

Death Investigation Oversight Council (DIOC) - Advisory

DIOC is a council committed to serving Ontario by ensuring that death investigation services are provided in a manner that is effective and accountable. DIOC was established as an independent advisory agency in order to provide oversight of coroners and forensic pathologists in Ontario. It also administers a public complaints review process through its complaints committee.

Financial Summary of Ministry ABCs

Expenditure

2013-14
(Estimates)
$

2012-13
(Interim Actuals)
$

Ontario Police Arbitration Commission

459,000

435,600

Death Investigation Oversight Council

432,200

241,800

Sub-total Vote 7 (Agencies, Boards & Commissions)

891,200

677,400

Fire Marshal's Public Fire Safety Council*

5,000

4,250

Constable Joe MacDonald Public Safety Officers' Survivors Scholarship Fund*

400,000

174,000

Total

1,296,200

855,650

*Funding for the Fire Marshal's Public Fire Safety Council and Constable Joe MacDonald Public Safety Officers' Survivors Scholarship Fund is provided through the appropriations of the Ontario Fire Marshal and the Public Safety Division, respectively.

Note: The responsibilities of the Ontario Parole Board, Ontario Civilian Police Commission, Animal Care Review Board and Fire Safety Commission have been transferred to the Ministry of the Attorney General - Safety, Licensing, Appeals and Standards Tribunals Ontario (SLASTO) cluster.



Ministry Financial Information

The following chart depicts the Ministry’s investment in 2013-14 to keep Ontarians safe and to support the Government’s commitment of ‘Stronger, Safer Communities.’


inistry Budget 2013-14 (Operating and Capital)Correctional Services $807.8M - 34.7%Emergency Planning and Management $70.3M - 3.0%Other Services $185.6M - 8.0%Statutory $9.5M - 0.4%Consolidation $(20.7)M - (0.9%)Public Safety $255.2M - 11.0%Ontario Provincial Police $1,018.4M - 43.8%Total: $2,326.1M

Note: Ministry Budget excludes capital assets and operating assets.


Table 1: Ministry Planned Expenditures 2013-14 ($M)

Operating

$2,244.2

Capital

$81.9

TOTAL

$2,326.1

Note: Ministry's planned expenditures include Statutory Appropriations and consolidations.


Table 2: Operating and Capital Summary by Vote

The mandate of the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services is to ensure that all of Ontario's diverse communities are safe, supported and protected by law enforcement and that public safety and correctional systems are safe, secure, effective, efficient and accountable. The Ministry has a wide range of responsibilities which include: front-line policing, establishing and enforcing policing and private security standards and providing police oversight services; coordinating community safety initiatives, animal welfare, forensic and coroner's services, fire investigation/prevention and public education, fire protection services, emergency planning and management, business continuity; and, supervising and rehabilitating adult offenders in correctional institutions and in the community.

Click here for an image of the complete chart.

Votes/Programs

Estimates

Change from

 

Estimates*

Interim

Actuals*

 

2013-14

Estimates

 

2012-13

Actuals

2011-12

 

 

2012-13

 

 

2012-13*

 

 

$

$

%

$

$

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OPERATING AND CAPITAL EXPENSE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ministry Administration Program

130,373,900

11,699,400

9.9%

118,674,500

119,946,200

108,675,225

Public Safety Division

255,205,400

760,300

0.3%

254,445,100

248,800,900

208,239,609

Ontario Provincial Police

1,018,353,500

(3,925,200)

(0.4)%

1,022,278,700

999,169,100

986,310,833

Correctional Services Program

807,833,200

15,267,400

1.9%

792,565,800

794,237,000

788,178,567

Justice Technology Services Program

50,898,400

(4,993,900)

(8.9)%

55,892,300

57,540,300

56,497,353

Agencies, Boards and Commissions

891,200

(700)

(0.1)%

891,900

677,400

735,874

Emergency Planning and Management

70,296,600

(3,130,100)

(4.3)%

73,426,700

70,946,500

72,040,269

Policy and Strategic Planning Division

3,405,200

3,700

0.1%

3,401,500

3,399,500

3,530,755

Total Operating and Capital Expense to be Voted

2,337,257,400

15,680,900

0.7%

2,321,576,500

2,294,716,900

2,224,208,485

Statutory Appropriations

9,512,487

1,817,900

23.6%

7,694,587

18,726,487

16,147,261

Ministry Total Operating and Capital Expense

2,346,769,887

17,498,800

0.8%

2,329,271,087

2,313,443,387

2,240,355,746

Capital Expense Adjustment

-

-

-

-

-

(50,414,747)

Consolidations

(20,695,000)

(3,774,600)

22.3%

(16,920,400)

(18,747,900)

(18,700,728)

Total Including Consolidations & Other Adjustments

2,326,074,887

13,724,200

0.6%

2,312,350,687

2,294,695,487

2,171,240,271

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OPERATING AND CAPITAL ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ministry Administration Program

3,000

-

-

3,000

-

-

Public Safety Division

29,909,000

(113,039,000)

(79.1)%

142,948,000

142,886,000

127,547,723

Ontario Provincial Police

24,364,700

(90,789,300)

(78.8)%

115,154,000

111,124,400

184,353,875

Correctional Services Program

55,979,500

(83,264,300)

(59.8)%

139,243,800

139,006,700

195,480,022

Justice Technology Services Program

3,000

-

-

3,000

-

-

Agencies, Boards and Commissions

2,000

-

-

2,000

-

-

Emergency Planning and Management

226,000

(68,000)

(23.1)%

294,000

261,971

565,301

Policy and Strategic Planning Division

3,000

-

-

3,000

-

-

Total Operating and Capital Assets to be Voted

110,490,200

(287,160,600)

(72.2)%

397,650,800

393,279,071

507,946,921

* Note that some figures for 2011-12 and 2012-13 have been restated to reflect transfers to/from other ministries and/or new government reporting standards for tangible capital assets previously reported in the Government Real Estate Portfolio (GREP). Interim actuals reflect the numbers presented in the 2013 Ontario Budget.

For additional financial information, see:

Printed Estimates:

http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/budget/estimates/2013-14/volume1/MCSCS.html

Public Accounts:

http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/english/budget/paccts/

Budget:

http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/budget/ontariobudgets/2013/



APPENDIX I: ANNUAL REPORT 2012-13

2012-13 Annual Report

The Ministry achievements for 2012-13 support the Government’s commitment of ‘Stronger, Safer Communities.’ The Ministry strives to meet its commitment of “serving all of Ontario’s diverse communities to keep our province safe.” Over the course of the year, the Ministry has made significant progress in the following areas:

Safer Streets for Ontario Families

The Government has expanded efforts to get guns and gangs off the street through initiatives such as a first-of-its-kind Guns and Gangs Strategy that enables police services across Ontario to work collaboratively to root out gang violence and stop the spread of firearms.


Youth Action Plan will help to build stronger neighbourhoods

Helping communities tackle crime and gang violence by providing alternatives for youth and ensuring safer communities and neighbourhoods for all Ontarians.

The Ministry, in partnership with the Ministry of Children and Youth Services, launched a Youth Action Plan in November 2012 that is helping an additional 13,000 young people find a job, and keep our streets free of guns, gangs and drugs.

As part of the plan, Ontario supported 21 police and community projects that identified at-risk young people and provided active community liaisons and peer-to-peer strategies to combat bullying and prevent violent crime. Local police services received funding to carry out crime prevention projects. Funding came from assets that have been seized by police as a result of being proceeds of crime.


Helping communities tackle crime and gang violence

It is on the ground, at the community level, where we can make the biggest difference.

The Ministry’s Safer and Vital Communities (SVC) Grant program helps community-based, not-for-profit organizations and First Nations chiefs and band councils deliver a variety of crime prevention programs. These programs are aimed at vulnerable individuals and focus on the risk factors associated with crime and victimization. For 2012-13, 32 community initiatives across the province were supported by the SVC Grant. The majority of these initiatives help at-risk young people develop a variety of skills to help them successfully move forward in life and rehabilitate those already in trouble with the law.


Investing in a successful anti-violence strategy

The Ministry is helping Ontario’s police make families safer in their own neighbourhoods by taking guns, drugs and gangsters off the streets.

The Ministry continues to support the successful Toronto Anti-Violence Intervention Strategy (TAVIS) with renewed funding to the Toronto Police Service. Launched in 2006, TAVIS helps police fight guns and gangs by assigning officers to areas experiencing an increase in violent activity by focusing on crime prevention, building relationships with local youth and businesses, and mobilizing communities. Since its inception in 2006, this initiative has led to 24,031 arrests and made 474,346 community contacts.

The Ministry also supports a province-wide anti-violence strategy modeled on the TAVIS program. The Provincial Anti-Violence Intervention Strategy (PAVIS) was launched in 2007 and now involves 22 police services.


Making the internet safer for children

Internet luring is a despicable crime that warrants our full attention. Keeping our children safe from internet predators is a key priority.

The Provincial Strategy to Protect Children from Sexual Abuse and Exploitation on the internet is making it safer for children to chat with friends, do homework and play games online. The Ministry provides an annual grant of $2.6 million for the strategy, which allows for an all-encompassing approach to prevent child abuse and exploitation and effectively apprehend and prosecute offenders. Since the provincial strategy was first implemented in 2006, 17,955 investigations have been conducted and 6,515 charges have been laid against 2,075 people. The strategy also aims to bring about awareness to better protect children from becoming victims of sexual predators.


Reduce Impaired Driving Everywhere (RIDE) spot checks along Ontario’s streets, highways, trails and waterways

The Ministry is helping to reduce accidents and save lives by supporting police services that conduct Reduce Impaired Driving Everywhere (RIDE) spot checks.

In 2008-09, the Ministry increased its commitment to support year-round RIDE spot check activities from $1.2 million to $2.4 million annually. That amount was maintained in 2012-13. The doubling of provincial funds for RIDE led to an increase across all categories of RIDE activities including more spot checks and driving counter-measures beyond those carried out by local police services, including First Nations police and Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) contract locations.

The Ministry’s investments have resulted in a higher number of spot checks. For example, between 2007-08 and 2008-09, the total number of spot checks across the province increased from 505,733 to 805,833, representing an increase of 59.3 per cent. The most recent available statistics show that between 2010 and 2011-12, the total number of spot checks across the province increased from 757,010 to 1,016,786, representing an increase of 34.3 per cent. Since 2003, the Ministry has invested over $15 million in grant funding for RIDE spot checks across the province.


Keeping more police officers on the streets

Ontario has more police officers patrolling our streets, more officers tackling the problems of guns and gangs, and more officers helping to make our communities safer and stronger.

Over 2,300 police officers are patrolling Ontario streets or are assigned to other priorities such as domestic violence and guns and gangs as a result of funding provided by the Province to local police services, and through the Federal Government’s Police Officer Recruitment Fund. The Ministry invests $68 million a year to help municipalities employ 2,000 more police officers under the Safer Communities – 1,000 Officer Partnership and Community Policing Partnership programs.


Engagement with police and municipal partners through Future of Policing Advisory Committee

We are committed to working with our partners to proactively shape the future of policing in Ontario.

In 2012-13, the Ministry established a Future of Policing Advisory Committee (FPAC). The FPAC grew out of an earlier Ministry-led Summit on the Future of Policing, which brought together police leaders and other partners to discuss the current challenges facing police services in Ontario, and their sustainability in the future.

Comprised of representatives of the policing and municipal community, the FPAC will provide strategic advice and recommend a course of action to the Ministry for consideration. The committee has set up working groups to consider:

• Crime prevention;

• Administration and infrastructure;

• Law enforcement and assistance to victims of crime; and,

• Emergency response and public order maintenance.


Ontario Provincial Police’s first fully operational bilingual detachment

French language services remain a critical operational component to providing exemplary policing services to the citizens and visitors of Hawkesbury and the surrounding area.

Effective December 1, 2012, the OPP Hawkesbury Detachment became the first detachment to be fully operational in both English and French. Eighty-three per cent of Hawkesbury residents are Francophones. All 58 uniform and civilian full-time positions at the detachment have been designated bilingual by the Ministry.

Although the OPP has numerous bilingually designated positions and offers French language services throughout the province, this designation of all detachment employees is unique to the communities that the Hawkesbury Detachment serves. The detachment’s bilingualism gives it an advanced ability to serve its local residents and visitors in either language, and also ensures that all employees of the detachment can communicate fully with each other.

Celebrating 50 years of excellence in police training

For 50 years the Ontario Police College has done a great job ensuring police officers from provincial, municipal and First Nations police services receive outstanding training to prepare themselves for a career in policing.

Ontario’s police college in Aylmer celebrated 50 years of training police officers in 2012. The college is a world leader in preparing police officers to safely and effectively perform their duties, while meeting the needs of Ontario’s diverse communities. The Ontario Police College offered its first classes in January 1963 in an abandoned Royal Canadian Air Force base. Approximately 10,000 students take courses each year at the college.

As part of the 50th anniversary, the College held special events linked to the three graduation ceremonies held in 2012, including the unveiling of a time capsule.

In 2012, the College also made great gains to improve its environmental footprint by diverting all organic waste from the food services operation.


Supporting a More Secure Ontario

Increasing fire protection in retirement homes and care facilities

Ontario is committed to working with its partners to increase fire safety in facilities that house our most vulnerable citizens.

In early 2013, Ontario invited public input on proposed changes to the Fire Code and Building Code that will improve fire safety in residences for seniors, people with disabilities and vulnerable Ontarians. Ontario has approximately 700 retirement homes, 400 long-term care facilities, and 3,000 other homes for vulnerable residents.

The proposed changes are based on expert advice from a Technical Advisory Committee led by the Office of the Fire Marshal. The committee examined long-term fire safety provisions, including enhanced training, inspections, and additional retrofits such as sprinklers and self-closing doors. Amendments to the Fire Code and Building Code were filed in Spring 2013 and are expected to come into force in January 2014.


Testing Ontario’s emergency response capabilities

Ontario must be ready to respond to natural and man-made disasters effectively to minimize their impact and ensure the safety of Ontario families.

In Fall 2012, Ontario conducted Exercise Trillium Resolve, a large-scale regional emergency exercise in southwestern Ontario to test the Province’s disaster response capabilities. Co-ordinated by Emergency Management Ontario (EMO), Exercise Trillium Resolve brought together almost 1,000 people from all levels of government, Bruce Power, operators of the Bruce Power Nuclear Generating Station, and non-governmental organizations. The exercise ran from October 15-19, and included simulations of such disasters as severe weather and industrial accidents in Bruce, Grey, Huron, and Wellington counties.

Provincial teams that took part included: the Emergency Medical Assistance Team, a mobile 56-bed medical field unit that can be deployed anywhere in Ontario with road access within 24 hours; and, the OPP UCRT Urban Search and Rescue - Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosive (USAR-CBRNE) Response Team.

The five-day exercise was an invaluable opportunity for stakeholders to build solid relationships, share new and innovative ideas, assess the Province’s emergency response capabilities and identify areas of improvement.


Supporting rescue efforts in Elliot Lake

Supporting Ontario’s front-line rescuers in their efforts to bring peace of mind to families waiting for word of their loved ones.

EMO co-ordinated the deployment of resources to aid rescue operations at a collapsed mall in Elliot Lake. A large portion of the roof at the Algo Centre Mall collapsed on June 23, 2012, killing two women. The Province supported local rescue efforts by dispatching 10 members and two medics from the OPP UCRT. EMO co-ordinated additional resources, including:

  • A large specialized crane and other heavy equipment; and,
  • Robots designed for mine rescue operations, equipped with camera and sound equipment.

The Province also worked with the Canadian Forces, who offered any support required by emergency responders at the scene. The Office of the Chief Coroner continues to investigate the mall collapse.


Sandy Lake evacuation

Working with First Nations partners to ensure the community’s safety during an emergency.

Sandy Lake is a fly-in First Nation community located approximately 600 kilometres northwest of Thunder Bay. On July 25, 2012, the Sandy Lake First Nation declared an emergency in anticipation of the need to evacuate the community due to forest fire concerns. Approximately 569 individuals were evacuated from the community to host communities in Fort Francis and Thunder Bay. All evacuees had returned to Sandy Lake by August 6.


Supporting Wawa evacuation and responding to Hurricane Sandy

Disaster can strike anytime and anywhere. We have a responsibility to prepare for, respond to, and recover from all types of emergencies, critical incidents and major events through EMO.

In late October 2012, while much of southern Ontario was bracing for the potential impact of Hurricane Sandy, the Municipality of Wawa declared an emergency due to community-wide flooding caused by torrential rain. EMO was the lead provincial agency for preparing Ontarians for Hurricane Sandy and evacuating residents from the Michipicoten First Nation around Wawa.

To help prepare for Hurricane Sandy, a dedicated web page on EMO’s website was set up. It included situation updates and information, as well as links on current weather conditions, local and provincial flooding, where to report a power outage, road conditions and closures. EMO’s social media channels on Facebook and Twitter were also engaged to communicate hurricane information. EMO has close to 15,000 subscribers for its @Ontario Warnings Twitter account.

On October 29, EMO co-ordinated and oversaw the evacuation of 67 residents of the Michipicoten First Nation to Fort Francis and Thunder Bay. The residents were returned to their homes safely on November 1.


Three-point plan to strengthen animal protection and enforcement

Cruelty to animals will not be tolerated in Ontario. We continue to work with our animal welfare partners to make sure all animals can live free of abuse and neglect.

The Ministry announced a three-point plan in October 2012 to improve care for marine mammals at aquariums and zoos, and strengthen animal welfare enforcement. The plan includes:

  • Improving the province-wide enforcement of the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (OSPCA) Act, and strengthening the governance of the OSPCA;
  • Ensuring the protection of marine mammals in captivity; and,
  • Exploring options for the licensing of zoos and aquariums.

The Ministry also released the report of the Animal Welfare Task Force. The task force was set up in response to the OSPCA-commissioned Meek-Lesage Review into animal sheltering in Ontario, and was made up of government ministries and stakeholders with connections to animal shelters, including the OSPCA. The report concluded that animals are well served by Ontario’s animal shelters, but recommended additional improvements in the operation of shelters and addressed related concerns in the areas of public health and worker health and safety.

Ontario has the strongest animal protection law in Canada. If there is more that can be done to better protect animals, then the Province will act.


Preventing cycling and pedestrian deaths

Cycling and pedestrian deaths are preventable. Cyclists, pedestrians and motorists must work together to make our roads and sidewalks safe.

The Chief Coroner of Ontario released two unprecedented reports in 2012 on steps to prevent cycling and pedestrian deaths. Both reports were undertaken as a result of concern, both from the public and from within the Office of the Chief Coroner, surrounding the issues of cycling and pedestrian safety following a spate of tragic deaths on bike and foot.

The Cycling Death Review examined the circumstances of 129 deaths that occurred from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2010, and was released June 18, 2012. The Pedestrian Death Review, which was released on September 19, 2012, focused on the circumstances of 95 deaths from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010.

Both reports concluded that these deaths were preventable. The Cycling Death Review produced 14 recommendations and the Pedestrian Death Review produced 27 recommendations in the areas of leadership, legislation, education, engineering and enforcement. Highlights included:

Cycling Death Review

  • Adoption of a “complete streets” approach, focused on the safety of all road users;
  • A comprehensive cycling safety public awareness strategy, starting in public schools;
  • Installing side guards on heavy trucks; and,
  • Introducing mandatory helmet legislation for cyclists of all ages.

Pedestrian Death Review

  • Providing municipalities with greater flexibility to adjust speed limits and create more pedestrian crossings;
  • Creating a Walking Strategy for Ontarians;
  • Installing side guards on heavy trucks; and,
  • Increasing enforcement.

Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC)

The TRC was established as a result of the 2007 Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. Its mandate is to tell Canadians about the 150-year history of the schools through statements from those whose lives were affected by them.


Ontario becomes the first province to give TRC access to a correctional facility

Connecting TRC Commissioners with Aboriginal inmates will give us greater insight into the cruel legacy of Indian Residential Schools, and may provide inmates with new hope when returning to their communities.

The TRC made its first visit to a provincial correctional facility in August 2012, when Commissioners visited Kenora Jail to hear statements from Aboriginal inmates.

Aboriginals make up 92 per cent of the inmate population of the Kenora Jail. Many are descended from children who were removed from their families and sent away to Indian Residential Schools in the Kenora area. The visit by the TRC ensured that they had an opportunity to be heard concerning the impact that the Indian Residential Schools had on their lives. TRC Chair Justice Murray Sinclair commended the Ministry for being the first provincial correctional system to facilitate the statement-gathering visit.


Investing in Infrastructure

Upgrading ageing infrastructure is an important element of the Ministry’s commitment to building safe and strong communities. We are continuing to update and renew vital infrastructure with environmentally progressive facilities needed to provide effective community safety.


State-of-the-art Forensic Services and Coroner’s Complex nears completion

The Forensic Services and Coroner’s Complex is a world-class facility that is being built to support public safety and the criminal justice system.

Construction on a new 550,000 square foot Forensic Services and Coroner’s Complex located at Downsview in Toronto is almost complete. The state-of-the-art facility will house the Centre of Forensic Sciences, the Office of the Chief Coroner, the Ontario Forensic Pathology Service and the Provincial Forensic Pathology Unit, replacing crowded and out-dated facilities in downtown Toronto. Occupancy is expected in fall 2013. The facility will support growing needs and keep pace with the demands of the justice sector.


Modernizing Ontario’s correctional infrastructure

Ensuring Ontario has efficient and effective correctional infrastructure to keep communities, correctional staff and those in our custody safe.

A new Toronto Intermittent Centre (TIC) began accepting inmate admissions on December 9, 2011. Co-located with the Toronto South Detention Centre (TSDC), the 320-bed, minimum security TIC is used primarily to house inmates serving weekend sentences.

The TIC is part of the Ministry’s strategy to consolidate and expand the correctional system by building modern, economic new jails while closing inefficient older facilities.

The TSDC is expected to be operational by the end of 2013. The facility will have 1,650 beds for adult males, including those with special needs or requiring mental health assessments.

Construction is underway on the South West Detention Centre (SWDC) in Windsor. The 315 bed, maximum-security facility will replace the existing Windsor Jail. It will feature state-of-the-art security technology and standards, an infirmary and special purpose beds.

TSDC and SWDC will:

  • Replace aging jails with modern, larger facilities;
  • Reflect sound correctional practices in a functional, maximum security working environment; and,
  • Maintain the highest of security standards.

Table 1: Ministry Interim Actual Expenditures 2012-13

 

Ministry Interim Actual Expenditures ($M) 2012-13

Operating

$2,229.8

Capital

$64.9

Staff Strength

(as of March 31, 2013)

16,506

Note: Ministry's interim actual expenditures include Statutory Appropriations and consolidations. Interim actuals reflect numbers presented in the 2013 Budget.

1 Reported on a calendar year.

2 Preliminary data as of February 7, 2013. The 2012 target was 0.37, based on the 2009-2011 average.

3 The 3-year provincial average is based on the preceding 3 years actual data.

4 Preliminary data as of February 2, 2013. Final data to be submitted after Statistics Canada verification of official data. The 2012 target was 90.1%, based on the 2009-2011 average.

4 5 Due to delay in reporting from municipalities, the Ministry has introduced a lag of one year when reporting on this measure to ensure availability of data. As a result, reporting on 2011 results occurs in the 2012-2013 fiscal year. Going forward, the Ministry will continue to report results with a one year lag (e.g., 2012 results will be reported in the 2013-2014 fiscal year). Data reported are based on a calendar year. The 2012-2013 target was 52.0, based on 2006-2010 average.

2012-2013 year-to-date information is from April 1, 2012 to January 31, 2013.