Accessibility Plan 2012-13

Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services
2014 ODA Accessibility Plan

 

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

Introduction

Section One: Report on Measures Taken by MCSCS in 2014

Section Two: Report on Measures Proposed by MCSCS for 2015 & 2016

Section Three: Addressing the Identification of Barriers

Links

Contact Us

Executive Summary

In 2014, the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services (MCSCS) continued to comply with the current accessibility legislative requirements and demonstrate leadership on accessibility for employees and clients.

Work continued in 2014 on mainstreaming accessibility into ministry activities. Employees have been asked to include proactive accommodation offers when sending emails or organizing meetings. Over 380 ministry employees have taken online training on how to use the OPS Inclusion Lens and staff have been directed to use the lens when developing new policies and practices.

To strengthen the compliance framework, the ministry participated in an Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) compliance assurance pilot. The pilot aimed to identify the policies, practices and procedures that managers and staff rely on to assure, rather than simply affirm, their AODA compliance. As an added accountability measure, staff have been required to have accessibility commitments in their performance plans.

Awareness raising continued this year, with ongoing communications about days of significance, such as Speech and Hearing Awareness Month, Mental Health Week and National Access Awareness Week. Accessible document training was provided for staff and reference resources were made available on the ministry’s intranet page. Four divisions – the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP), Operational Support Division, Community Services Division and Public Safety Division – hosted mental health educational events.

Several exciting initiatives were rolled out to improve access for people with disabilities. In 2014, MCSCS also opened the modern and accessible Toronto South Detention Centre in Toronto and South West Detention Centre in the Windsor area, which have accessible programming design considerations built in.

Work is already underway in Correctional Services, as part of the Human Rights Project Charter and its multi-year Human Rights Plan introduced in 2014, to address all human rights issues, including enhanced accessibility, in employment and service delivery. The plan will be implemented in the coming years to ensure that human rights are anchored in all of Correctional Services.

The Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) set up a Mental Health Working Group to develop an evidence-based mental health strategy that will provide a consistent, coordinated approach for officers to use when interacting with people with mental health issues.

Meanwhile, through the Safer and Vital Communities Grant, the Public Safety Division is supporting initiatives that promote mental health among at-risk people, and the development and implementation of community-led safety projects.

For the next two years, the ministry will continue to build on its achievements to date and continue to identify and remove accessibility barriers.

Introduction

Under the Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2001 (ODA), ministries are required to produce, and make available to the public, annual plans that identify how they will identify and remove barriers to accessibility.

The ODA Accessibility Plan (the Plan) is an opportunity to showcase our ministry’s accomplishments and to demonstrate how we are modeling compliance with our regulated accessibility requirements.

In 2010, the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services began complying with the first accessibility standard established under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) - Accessibility Standards for Customer Service. In 2011, the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation (IASR) was introduced, establishing phased-in requirements in the following accessibility standards:

  • Information and Communications;
  • Employment;
  • Transportation; and,
  • Design of Public Spaces

Each year, the Ontario Public Service (OPS), as an obligated organization, confirms its compliance with the requirements of these standards to the Accessibility Directorate of Ontario. The ODA Plan provides an opportunity for our ministry to go beyond confirming compliance with these regulated minimum requirements. Specifically, the Plan allows us to highlight the measures taken by our ministry to identify and remove barriers in the previous year while proposing measures for the coming year that will make our ministry more accessible.

The IASR establishes that obligated organizations shall create and maintain a multi-year accessibility plan (MYAP) that outlines the organization’s strategies to prevent and remove barriers to accessibility. To meet the MYAP requirement, the OPS released Leading the Way Forward in 2012.

Organizations are also required to develop an annual status report that highlights progress in advancing the MYAP strategy and in meeting the requirements of the IASR. In 2013, the OPS released its first Annual Status Report, highlighting progress made in 2012.

MCSCS’ 2014 ODA Plan demonstrates how the measures our ministry has taken and the measures we propose for the coming years support the key outcomes and deliverables of the MYAP.

To access MCSCS’ and other ministries’ 2014 ODA Accessibility Plans, visit Ontario.ca.

Section One: Report on Measures Taken by MCSCS in 2014

Customer Service

OPS MYAP Key Outcome:

People with disabilities who are OPS customers receive quality goods and services in a timely manner.

Measures Taken by MCSCS in 2014:

In 2014, MCSCS took the following steps to ensure that people with disabilities who are OPS customers received quality goods and services in a timely manner:

  • As part of last year’s commitment to survey staff and identify barriers and recommendations on accessible services, the accessibility lead began working with divisions to analyse 2014 employee survey data as it relates to accessibility matters. Building on the employee survey results, an anonymous survey was rolled out in November 2014 to identify accessible devices in the workplace and identify accessibility barriers. An implementation plan will be rolled out in 2015 to ensure staff know how to use accessible devices in the workplace and implement accessibility improvements.
  • The ministry took part in an AODA compliance assurance pilot in 2014. The purpose of the pilot was to identify the policies, practices and procedures that managers and staff rely on in order to assure, rather than simply affirm, their AODA compliance. As a result, all ministry directors provided assurance that their staff:
  • Have read and are familiar with the OPS Accessible Customer Service Policy.
  • Are aware that they must notify the public about any service disruption that would prevent accessibility for persons with disabilities and provide information about accessible alternatives that may be available.
  • Refer to the MCSCS accessibility intranet site for sample disruption notices.
  • Have been required to have a commitment in their 2014-15 performance plans to provide or arrange for the provision of accessible formats and communication supports for persons with disabilities in a timely manner, taking into account the requestor’s needs and at no extra cost.
  • The MCSCS Contact Us Internet page clearly notifies the public about the availability of accessible formats and communications for the public. The page states: “As outlined in our Accessible Customer Service policy, we are committed to providing accessible customer service. On request, we can arrange for accessible formats and communications supports.”
  • Staff were required to have a commitment in their 2014-15 performance plans to proactively offer accommodation in emails and meeting invites. Directors attested in May-June 2014 that staff will confirm during their performance discussion reviews that when sending out emails, they have the following sentence in their:
  • signature line: “If you have any accommodation needs or require communication supports or alternate formats, please let me know.”
  • meeting invites: “If you have any accommodation needs in order to participate fully in any aspect of this event, please let me know.”
  • The ministry’s accessibility lead designed a new accessibility poster in 2014, notifying the public about the availability of accessible formats and communication supports. The poster is available to all staff on the ministry’s updated accessibility intranet page. It was also disseminated electronically to over 16,000 staff in May 2014, through a CAO memo to all staff requiring that it be displayed in offices in a prominent place for the public. The poster was also sent in hardcopy format to over 600 locations in November 2014.
  • To help improve services for prospective employees and victims of crime, two of the ministry’s branches participated in an OPS-wide electronic teletype (e-TTY) service pilot. TTY service allows people who are deaf, hard-of-hearing or speech-impaired to use the telephone by typing text messages. The new, state-of-the-art system is software-based. This means that TTY users no longer need a physical device to communicate via TTY. Instead, the service lives on the user’s desktop and is accessible anywhere the OPS network is available. The two participating branches were the HR Strategic Business Unit in the Corporate Services Division and the Victim Notification Unit in the Management and Operational Support Branch, Operational Support Division. Their participation in the pilot provided staff with updated I+IT service, which helped make MCSCS more accessible for both prospective employees and victims of crime who use TTY.
  • The launch of the e-TTY service availability in the OPS was communicated to all ministry employees through OPS Weekly and Topical in February 2014 and a follow-up ministry memo in October 2014. To date, the ministry has 10 TTY lines.
  • The Procurement and Business Improvement Branch in the Corporate Services Division audited the ministry’s TTY lines as part of its yearly common service standards audit, to ensure high-quality customer service for people with disabilities.
  • The ministry’s accessibility lead continued to analyze feedback received and tracked it accordingly.
  • To ensure that accessibility is considered whenever OPS business is conducted, the director of the HR Strategic Business Unit sent a memo to all staff on May 9, 2014 asking staff to have a commitment in their performance plans to use the OPS Inclusion Lens when developing new policies, procedures and practices. As of October 2014, 386 ministry staff completed the OPS Inclusion Lens e-training. Examples of revised policies, procedures and practices include:
  • A revamped package prepared for Correctional Officers who are promoting Correctional Services to the public. The revisions made, ensure that ministry staff work with hosting organizations to ensure the speaking events are accessible for people with disabilities.
  • A draft inclusion meeting checklist integrates accessibility with other intersectional factors to consider when organizing inclusive meetings. When implemented, the checklist will help ensure holistic service delivery for clients with disabilities who may also identify as Aboriginal, Francophone, racialized, women, lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender.
  • On November 21, 2014, the accessibility lead and 10 ministry staff attended a “train-the-trainer” session on creating accessible Word and PowerPoint documents.
  • Correctional Services continued its work on the Human Rights Project Charter (the Project Charter), which was established to support MCSCS in its ongoing work to identify and eliminate discrimination in employment and service delivery in Correctional Services. The Project Charter is a joint partnership among MCSCS, the Ministry of Government and Consumer Services (MGCS) and the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC). In 2014, a multi-year Human Rights Plan was developed. The Human Rights Plan is a two-phased, seven-year action plan that reflects the subcommittees’ recommendations on how to address human rights issues in Correctional Services workplaces and in our program and service delivery to clients. The plan anchors human rights in all of Correctional Services’ work.
  • The 2014 Correctional Services Provincial Managers’ annual meeting featured retired Lieutenant-Colonel Stephane Grenier, a Canadian Forces veteran. He provided new paradigms regarding mental health, recovery and resilience.
  • The Community Services Division rolled out a number of learning opportunities to help probation and parole officers better understand the lived impact of mental health issues. In September 2013, the division hosted a lunch and learn presentation of the “Opening Eyes, Opening Minds: The Ontario Burden of Mental Illness and Addictions Report” produced by the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. In Eastern Region, a Somalian guest speaker discussed the cultural aspects of mental health. In 2013, the division expanded psychological services to remote northern communities, including Armstrong, twice monthly.
  • Staff in the Operational Support Division attended the launch of the Ontario Human Rights Commission’s “Policy on preventing discrimination based on mental health disabilities and addictions.” The accessibility and inclusion lead disseminated the policy with all divisional representatives to increase the level of awareness across the ministry.
  • Under executive leadership, the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) set up a Mental Health Working Group to develop an evidence-based mental health strategy that will provide a consistent, coordinated approach for officers to use when interacting with people with mental health issues. The goal is to create a strategy that will: help mitigate risk and victimization; ensure consistency of response while recognizing the unique needs of detachments and communities; and increase the effectiveness of police/community response to these complex and challenging situations. In 2014, the OPP introduced the Brief Mental Health Screener, a science-based, standardized mental health screening form and is requiring all OPP front-line officers to use the form for all calls involving persons with mental health issues. The Brief Mental Health Screener is based on the interRAI Mental Health Assessment System, a comprehensive standardized instrument mandated in 2005 by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care for use with all patients admitted to an Ontario hospital for inpatient psychiatric care. The form was designed to help officers articulate in medical terms why a person is being brought to the hospital for psychiatric assessment. By using this standardized instrument, the OPP will be able to track all calls for service where mental health is a factor, which will allow the organization to deploy resources effectively and efficiently.
  • The OPP has been participating on a national working group, called T911, to enable communities of deaf and hard of hearing, to communicate with 911 operators via text messaging. Significant technical progress has been made to date, including upgrading Provincial Communication Centre telephone systems to be IP compatible, negotiating technical solutions and installing IP circuits in Smiths Falls, London and Orillia. Further work continues on this important project.
  • In 2014, the Public Safety Division promoted mental health through the Safer and Vital Communities Grant. The grant supports the development and implementation of community-led safety projects. The theme for the 2014/15 – 2015/16 grant is “Crime Prevention through the Promotion of Mental Health.” Proposals sought focus on how to create and enhance “protective factors” that promote mental health among at-risk people. Protective factors are tools that can help an at-risk person through the life events and experiences that would normally cause problem behaviour, by helping them, for example, increase their self-esteem or develop better coping skills. To develop internal capacity on understanding mental health issues, the division completed a number of learning sessions for its staff. Topics included mental health in the workplace, understanding seasonal affective disorder and exploring the relationship between hoarding and animal welfare issues.

Information and Communications

MYAP Key Outcome:

Information and Communications are available in accessible formats or with necessary supports to all OPS staff and customers.

Measures Taken by MCSCS in 2014:

MCSCS implemented the following measures to ensure that information and communications are available in accessible formats or with necessary supports to all OPS staff and customers:

  • As part of the 2014 AODA compliance assurance pilot, directors attested that:
  • Staff whose duties include Internet and intranet maintenance are aware that new Internet, intranet websites and content on those sites need to be accessible.
  • Staff whose duties include internet and intranet maintenance are aware of the tools and guides available for web practitioners to support achieving WCAG 2.0 AA standards.
  • Staff whose duties include Internet and intranet maintenance ensure that all new sites achieve WCAG 2.0 AA standards, as required by the IASR.
  • Staff have been required to have a commitment in their 2014-15 performance plans to provide or arrange for the provision of accessible formats and communication supports for persons with disabilities in a timely manner, taking into account the requestor’s needs and at no extra cost.
  • Staff were required to have a commitment in their 2014-15 performance plans to proactively offer accommodation in emails and meeting invites, by having the following sentence in their:
  • signature line: “If you have any accommodation needs or require communication supports or alternate formats, please let me know.”
  • meeting invites: “If you have any accommodation needs in order to participate fully in any aspect of this event, please let me know.”
  • The ministry sent seven delegates to the 2013 Expo/Job Opportunities Information Network (JOIN) conference and five at the 2014 OPS EXPO/JOIN conference.
  • Ministry executives and the Accessibility lead have Braille on their business cards.
  • In support of the commitment to communicate the availability of accessible formats and communications supports to the public, the two branches that participated in the OPS-wide e-TTY service pilot took active steps to communicate the availability of the new TTY lines. The HR Strategic Business Unit in the Corporate Services Division updated its letterhead templates, business cards and INFO-GO information. The Victim Notification Unit created a poster for the public advertising of its new TTY service.
  • On November 21, 2014, the accessibility lead and 10 ministry staff attended a “train-the-trainer” session on creating accessible Word and PowerPoint documents.
  • To ensure that websites and technology solutions meet IASR requirements, the Justice Technology Services division set up an IT Accessibility Compliance Working Group in September 2014. The aim of the working group is to identify current ministry websites and technology solutions, complete a gap analysis and an accessibility compliance implementation plan.

Employment

MYAP Key Outcome:

OPS employees with disabilities participate fully and meaningfully in their employment.

Measures Taken by MCSCS in 2014:

MCSCS implemented the following measures to ensure that employees with disabilities participate fully and meaningfully in their employment:

  • To increase awareness of employment accommodation directives, policies and plans with managers, the accessibility lead updated the content of the accessibility intranet page to reflect updated policies and directives.
  • As part of the 2014 AODA compliance assurance pilot, directors attested that:
  • Hiring MCSCS managers are aware that the Recruitment Services Centre, at the Ministry of Government and Consumer Services, has a process to notify employees and the public about the availably of accommodation for persons with disabilities during the recruitment process.
  • Hiring MCSCS managers are aware of the language used on the OPS careers website related to accessibility, accommodation and the commitments made to persons with disabilities, specifically:
  • The Recruitment Philosophy, which states:

“During the recruitment process, applicants have the right to request accommodation. Applicants invited to participate in an assessment process (such as an interview or testing) and who require accommodation, should discuss their needs with us. For instance, someone with a disability may require alternate formats for written materials, or physical adjustments to a computer set-up. Everyone is different, so we will take into account individual accessibility needs. Another type of accommodation would be a candidate request to reschedule an interview or testing date because of a religious holiday.”

  • The interview invitation that includes the following proactive offer of accommodation: “If you have any accommodation needs in order to participate fully in any aspect of this interview process, please let me know.”
  • Hiring MCSCS managers and their staff support barrier-free recruitment by arranging accommodation to applicants with disabilities, upon request.
  • Staff have been required to have a commitment in their 2014-15 performance plans to proactively offer accommodation in emails and meeting invites.
  • Managers and staff are made aware of the policies and supports available to employees with disabilities, specifically, the OPS Employment Policy and the OPS Employment Accommodation and Return to Work Operating Policy
  • Staff were made aware of changes to policies created to support employees with disabilities through memo communications to all staff and the MCSCS accessibility intranet site.
  • If requested, staff are prepared to help employees with disabilities to stay informed of policies used to support employees with disabilities, and to address questions about changes to these policies.
  • Staff were made aware of the requirement to provide/arrange for accessible formats and communication supports for employees with disabilities for information that is needed to perform the employee’s job and information that is generally available to employees in the workplace.
  • Managers take into account the needs of employees with disabilities and their individual accommodation plans during discussions related to performance management, career development or advancement.
  • Managers and staff understand that when individualized workplace emergency response information is required, it must be included in accommodation plans of employees with disabilities.
  • Managers and staff involved in emergency evacuation provide individualized workplace emergency response information when made aware of employees with disabilities that require assistance in emergency situations, in compliance with the Management Board of Cabinet Occupational Health and Safety Policy.
  • Managers and staff involved in emergency evacuation are aware of the tools and guides available through HROntario and use them when appropriate, including HROntario’s Emergency Evacuation Planning intranet page.
  • The ministry had 40 participants in the Diversity Mentoring Partnership Program (DMPP) in 2013-14 and increased the number to 60 participants in 2014-15. The DMPP fosters reciprocal learning about inclusion, diversity and accessibility between executive and employee partners and aims to support employees who self-identify with one of the five under-represented groups in senior management: Aboriginals; Francophones; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ); persons with disabilities; and visible minorities.
  • On May 9, 2014, managers were required to have the following inclusion and accessibility commitments in their 2014-15 performance plans:
  • Proactively offer accommodation in emails and meeting invites.
  • Upon request, provide or arrange for the provision of accessible formats and communication supports for persons with disabilities in a timely manner, taking into account the requestor’s needs and at no extra cost.
  • Ensure accommodation of the needs of job applicants and existing staff with disabilities in accordance with the OPS Employment Accommodation and Return to Work Operating Policy.
  • Completed mandatory accessibility training.
  • Ensure that accessibility and inclusion-related performance commitments are reflected in staff performance plans, at all levels.
  • Ensure that staff in their unit/branch/division is familiar with the ministry’s inclusion plan that is aligned with the OPS three year Inclusion Strategic Plan, 2013 – 2016 and the OPS Multi-Year Accessibility Plan and assigned resources to support their implementation.
  • If applicable: Participate in the Diversity Mentoring Partnership Program and provided feedback to “mentees” on learning experiences gained through the program.
  • Ensure that inclusion-related messages are deliberately embedded in all unit/branch/divisional/ministry internal and external communications.
  • Ensure that staff are supported and recognized for their participation in Employee Network-related activities.
  • Ensure that the OPS Inclusion Lens is applied in the development and review of programs and services
  • As part of last year’s commitment to survey staff and identify barriers and recommendations on accessible services, the accessibility lead began working with divisions to analyse 2014 employee survey data, identify barriers and make recommendations on accessible services for staff.
  • MCSCS supported the Ministry of Government and Consumer Services in its disability management review, by providing feedback on proposed changes. A rollout plan from the Ministry of Government and Consumer Services is in place to implement the December 1, 2014 recommendations.
  • Between December 2013 and November 2014, 185 OPP managers and uniform supervisors at the sergeant rank participated in a training component on injury/illness employment accommodation.
  • In 2014, 248 OPP civilian managers or uniform at Staff Sergeant rank or higher participated in a training session called “Managing for a Healthy Workplace”, which includes the Workplace Discrimination and Harassment Policy and injury/illness employment accommodation components.
  • The OPP also rolled out a campaign entitled “Healthy Workplace, Healthy Mind” to promote a healthy workplace and eliminate stigma associated with mental health issues. Some of the initiatives completed as part of this campaign include:
  • The publication of an article entitled “Working Together for Organizational and Employee Health” in the September 2013 edition of OPPA Your Health & Wellness magazine.
  • Hosting learning events such as “Got Stress? Let’s Talk About Building Resiliency” in recognition of World Mental Health Day and “Hope, Understanding & Victory” in support of the 2013 Not Myself Today campaign. In January 2014, the OPP hosted a speaking event “The Crack In My Shell, Policing & Mental Health 101” with a retired sergeant and another event in March 2014 called “Never Quit” about living physical and mental resilience with a retired master corporal. In June 2014, the OPP hosted two speaking events called “Prevention. Dignity. Respect” and “Living Well with Shiftwork.” It also hosted a family night for OPP members and their families to learn about health, wellness and supports available to them and to their families.

Built Environment

MYAP Key Outcome:

There is greater accessibility into, out of and around OPS facilities and public spaces.

Measures Taken by MCSCS in 2014:

MCSCS implemented the following measures to ensure greater accessibility into, out of and around ministry facilities and public spaces:

  • As part of our ministry’s ongoing commitment to ensure that those in our custody are kept in safe, humane and secure conditions, while keeping Ontario’s communities safe, the Toronto South Detention Centre (TSDC) opened its doors on January 27, 2014 and started admitting its first group of inmates. Located on the site of the former Mimico Correctional Centre, this state-of-the-art, maximum- security, 1,650-bed facility replaced the Toronto Jail and the Toronto West Detention Centre. The TSDC will help reduce overcrowding and provide additional capacity needed in our institutions in the Greater Toronto Area. Further, it provides better work conditions and a healthier, accessible environment for staff and inmates. The TSDC houses remanded and sentenced inmates in both direct and indirect supervision units. Those in the direct supervision units will be offered educational opportunities, group counselling, one-on-one programs, recreation and other specialized programs aimed at reducing the reoffending rate. In addition, the TSDC has four Special Needs Units with an allocation of 160 general special needs beds, plus 26 beds for mental health assessments. The following built-environment accessibility considerations were addressed at TDSC and the Toronto Intermittent Centre:
  • Each inmate living unit has accessible washrooms/showers and an accessible cell.
  • Public areas - such as the lobby, the washrooms and visitation space - are accessible.
  • Accessible washrooms for a designated number of staff.
  • Staff control posts are ergonomically designed.
  • Assistive devices are in place, such as telephone typewriters (TTY), hearing assist teletype, infrared microphones and automatic door assists.
  • Visual fire alarms
  • In July 2014, the South West Detention Centre (SWDC) officially opened its doors near Windsor. The SWDC replaced the Chatham Jail and the Windsor Jail. When fully operational, SWDC will support more than 260 direct and in-direct jobs, including correctional officers, medical staff and support workers. The SWDC helps meet Ontario’s male and female inmate capacity needs and offers a number of specialized programs to reduce re-offending. The facility is built around eight direct supervision living units which encourage positive interaction between staff and inmates by placing the correctional staff within inmate living units. The facility will also introduce a new mental health unit and other services to foster positive change for the inmate, doing so in an environment that keeps the public, corrections staff and inmates safe. Some accessibility highlights at the SWDC, include:
  • Accessible washrooms for visitors and staff.
  • Creating barrier-free access from the parking lot to the front door with cane detectable railing and textured surface.
  • Accessible signage, including Braille.
  • Accessible washrooms and showers for inmates.
  • Barrier-free access to outside yard.
  • Phones with volume control and different height wall mounts to accommodate mobility device users – such as scooter and wheelchair users.
  • Work began at the Quinte Detention Centre on four accessible cells, to be completed in the spring of 2015. Cells are wheelchair accessible, have bunks and toilets that can facilitate wheelchair movements and have accessible toilets and sinks. An accessible shower area will also be available.
  • The ministry selected an accessible public art design for the Forensic Services and Coroner’s Complex in Toronto
  • Accessibility features were incorporated into the office retrofit for the Public Safety Division on the 12th floor of 25 Grosvenor Street in Toronto. Specific features include new automated door access, legislated widths in all corridors and greater usage of natural lighting.
  • The accessibility lead and Facilities and Capital Planning Branch Director scheduled regular meetings to discuss accommodation issues within existing ministry infrastructure and prepare for the January 1, 2015 IASR requirements on the design of public spaces.
  • MCSCS participated in the e-TTY software pilot.
  • MCSCS increased manager awareness of barrier-free obligations by participating in the AODA compliance assurance pilot.

Other Commitments

MYAP Key Outcome:

OPS staff are able to identify barriers to accessibility, in OPS policies, programs, services and facilities, and actively seek solutions to prevent or remove them on a continuing basis throughout the organization.

Measures Taken by MCSCS in 2014:

MCSCS implemented the following additional measures to enhance accessibility:

  • The ministry raised awareness around accessibility issues through ongoing communications around days of significance, such as Speech and Hearing Awareness Month, and Mental Health Week. National Access Awareness Week was marked with two accessibility slideshows, entitled “Universal Symbols of Accessibility” and “Accessibility Starts with You,” which ran on the internal lobby TV at the ministry headquarters.
  • As part of awareness raising, the Policy and Strategic Planning Division hosted a learning event with David Lepofsky, Chair of Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance, on June 23, 2014. The event was entitled
    “Embedding Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities in the Workplace.” During his engaging talk, Mr. Lepofsky talked about how to tackle barriers facing persons with disabilities and how to build accessibility into daily work.
  • Correctional Services embedded accessibility, diversity and inclusion into its code of conduct. The Ontario Correctional Services Code of Conduct and Professionalism (COCAP) was announced in a Deputy Minister memo to all staff on August 21, 2014. The COCAP is designed to outline staff responsibilities as well as the professional standards essential to maintaining a healthy, respectful, diverse, inclusive and safe work environment that fosters open communication.
  • MCSCS expanded the Inclusion Working Group membership to include the ministry’s representative on the Disability Advisory Committee to provide ongoing input. Ongoing input and advice from the Inclusion Working Group meetings were communicated to the senior management team.
  • MCSCS continued to provide accessibility training to staff. The Human Resources Strategic Business Unit (HR SBU) in Corporate Services Division tracked the completion of mandatory training and provided the compliance reports to divisional accessibility leads for action.
  • The Procurement Unit continued to use the checklist, “Meeting Accessibility Considerations in Procurement,” developed by Supply Chain Management, as part of the approvals process. The unit keeps the checklist on file with other supporting documents and has incorporated it as a step in existing documented procurement procedures within the ministry.
  • The ministry’s accessibility lead or her delegate participated in OPS inclusion and accessibility communities of practice to leverage knowledge, share best practices, and ensure consistency in application of concepts.

Section Two: Report on Measures Proposed by MCSCS for 2015 & 2016

Customer Service

OPS MYAP Key Outcomes

People with disabilities who are OPS customers receive quality goods and services in a timely manner.

Measures Proposed by MCSCS for 2015 & 2016

The ministry’s proposed customer service measures are to:

  • Continue to proactively offer accommodation and to communicate the availability of accessible formats and communications supports to the public.
  • Ensure notice disruption policies are in place when services are unavailable.
  • Review and analyze accessibility feedback received from our staff and clients to facilitate continuous improvement in our programs and services. Roll out implementation plan to ensure staff know how to use accessible devices in the workplace and make accessibility improvements.
  • Apply the OPS Inclusion Lens to build accessibility into new internal policies, procedures and practices.
  • According to job duties, require staff to have taken OPS Inclusion Lens training by December 31, 2015.
  • Continue to remind employees of the requirement to purchase goods and services that meet or exceed accessibility requirements and utilize the accessible procurement resources provided by the OPS.
  • The OPP will work with its partners to determine programming and policy options that will affect all of Ontario's police services, as recommended in the Ombudsman's Report “In the Line of Duty."
  • The OPP will continue work on T911, to enable communities of deaf and hard of hearing, to communicate with 911 via text messaging.
  • Audit the ministry TTY lines to ensure compliance with the common service standards and a high level of service for people with disabilities using TTY.
  • Correctional Services will implement its multi-year Human Rights Plan.

Information and Communications

MYAP Key Outcome:

Information and Communications are available in accessible formats or with necessary supports to all OPS staff and customers.

Measures Proposed by MCSCS for 2015 & 2016:

The ministry’s proposed information and communications measures are to:

  • The IT Accessibility Compliance Working Group will complete a gap analysis and IASR compliance implementation plan for the ministry’s websites and technology solutions in 2015.
  • Continue to train webmasters on accessible websites and staff on web-ready documents.
  • Continue to communicate the availability of accessible formats and communications supports to the public.
  • Continue to promote the availability of e-TTY lines.
  • Send at least five ministry delegates to Expo/Job Opportunities Information Network (JOIN) conference in 2015.

Employment

MYAP Key Outcome:

OPS employees with disabilities participate fully and meaningfully in their employment.

Measures Proposed by MCSCS for 2015 & 2016:

The ministry’s proposed employment measures are to:

  • Continue to promote awareness of employment accommodation directives, policies and plans with managers.
  • Continue to assure the availability of accessible formats and communications supports for employees.
  • Continue to participate in the 2015-16 Diversity Mentoring Partnership Program.
  • Develop and implement a plan to address accessibility recommendations from the 2014 employee survey.
  • Continue to ensure that managers and staff have accessibility performance commitments.
  • Correctional Services will implement its multi-year Human Rights Plan.

Built Environment

MYAP Key Outcome:

There is greater accessibility into, out of and around OPS facilities and public spaces.

Measures Proposed by MCSCS for 2015 & 2016:

The ministry’s proposed built environment measures are to:

  • Continue to ensure that the design of facilities meet Infrastructure Ontario’s 2006 Barrier Free Design Standards.
  • Schedule regular meetings between the accessibility lead and Facilities and Capital Planning Branch director to discuss accommodation issues within existing ministry infrastructure.
  • Continue to increase manager awareness of barrier-free obligations.
  • Deliver a training module titled “Accessible Built Environment in the OPS” to staff whose job duties include developing policy or providing goods, services, or facilities on behalf of MCSCS. Ensure the training is part of on-boarding of new employees.

Other Outcomes Deliverables

MYAP Key Outcome

OPS staff are able to identify barriers to accessibility, in OPS policies, programs, services and facilities, and actively seek solutions to prevent or remove them on a continuing basis throughout the organization.

Measures Proposed by MCSCS for 2015 & 2016

The ministry’s proposed further measures are to:

  • Continue ongoing staff training to enable them to remove barriers to accessibility. Courses that will be promoted and tracked include:
  • Accessible Built Environment in the OPS;
  • IASR Information and Communications Standards;
  • IASR Employment Standards;
  • IASR in the OPS;
  • Working Together an Ontario Human Rights Commission;
  • May I Help You; and
  • May I Help You – Supplementary

Section Three: Addressing the Identification of Barriers

The OPS Diversity Office and the Ministry of the Attorney General (MAG) have developed a revised approach to continue with the review of government legislation for accessibility barriers. As part of this approach, high impact statutes that meet the following criteria will be reviewed:

  • Statutes that affect persons with disabilities directly;
  • Statutes that provide for the delivery of widely applicable services or programs;
  • Statutes that provide benefits or protections; or
  • Statutes that affect a democratic or civic right or duty.

This review will be completed by the end of 2014. The government has decided to review these statutes because it is anticipated that changes in these areas will have the highest impact on those Ontarians who have accessibility needs. Statutes under the responsibility of MCSCS were not identified as part of this review.

In support of our commitment to improve accessibility for people with disabilities, MCSCS will continue to review government initiatives, including Acts, regulations, policies, programs, practices and services for the purposes of identifying and removing barriers.

Links

OPS Multi-Year Accessibility Plan - Leading the Way Forward,

Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2001

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005

Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation

Accessibility Standards for Customer Service

Ontario Accessibility Website

Accessible, Fair and Sustainable Services for People with Developmental Disabilities program

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines

Contact Us

Questions or comments about the ministry’s accessibility plan are welcome.

General inquiries: 416-326-5000
Toll-free number: 1-866-517-0571
TTY number: 416-326-5511
TTY toll free number: 1-866-517-0572
Email: MCSCS.Feedback@ontario.ca
Ministry website address: ontario.ca/safety

Visit the Ministry of Economic, Development, Trade and Employment web portal. The site promotes accessibility and provides information and resources on how to make Ontario an accessible province for everyone.

Alternate formats of this document are available upon request from:

ServiceOntario Publications

Phone:1-800-668-9938
TTY:1-800-268-7095

© 2013 Queen’s Printer for Ontario

ISSN 1710-0569